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6 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: July 2017
I have cruised on the Marina twice and was wondering how I would find the R class (smaller ship than the O class) Insignia. Well, I loved it. Why? The size was excellent and the passengers did not overwhelm the ports or tendering ... Read More
I have cruised on the Marina twice and was wondering how I would find the R class (smaller ship than the O class) Insignia. Well, I loved it. Why? The size was excellent and the passengers did not overwhelm the ports or tendering operations. Just a nice scale. True the Veranda suites are smaller and particularly the showers than the Marina but they were not disappointing. I did not miss the other specialty restaurants they have on the O ships. Food was excellent and fully up to Marina/Oceania standards. Which I have found to be the best of all other cruise lines that we have taken, mainly AMA and Holland America. I had read a review prior to the trip that stated that the Insignia was tired and dog eared. I looked very closely at a number of areas of the ship and found her to be in excellent condition. I think the main lounge was a little weak (small) for entertainment but we don't cruise for the entertainment. Piano bar and string quartets are more of our thing and was very good on Insignia. I loved the itinerary because they were unique ports and not tourist traps. I learned things about places I had never read about. Service was outstanding as it has been on our other Oceania cruises. Booked next years cruise while on board. Read Less
11 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: June 2013
We embarked on the Rekjavik to Stockholm cruise this past June and found the quality degrading in several areas. 1 - The hotel in Reykjavik (Icelandair Rekyjavik Marina) was awful and certainly not up to Regent's previous standards. ... Read More
We embarked on the Rekjavik to Stockholm cruise this past June and found the quality degrading in several areas. 1 - The hotel in Reykjavik (Icelandair Rekyjavik Marina) was awful and certainly not up to Regent's previous standards. The bathroom was separated from the room by frosted glass sliding doors that didn't close completely and were only inches from the bed. The shower didn't have a pan floor so water ran all over the bathroom floor when you used it. The floor tiles were so slippery when wet that we laid down 3 bath towels to avoid falling. Only liquid hand soap was provided for sink and shower. No shampoo, conditioner or lotion. 2 - The suite was typical pleasant cat. D,E,F,G,H but the sink drain leaked and 2 lights were out in the bathroom. Of course these were fixed when we complained but why did we have these problems in the first place. 3 - The Voyager had an annoying vibration in our suite and it even could be felt in the observation lounge on deck 11. I assumed a problem with the engines or propellers. I was told that it happens when the ship goes fast. Never had that before and after hearing that there were propulsion problems earlier in the year my suspicions were confirmed. It is good that the ship is going into drydock in October. She needs it. 4 - Food and wine not what it used to be. Lower quality wine being served in all restaurants. Thanks to Boris, the head wine sommelier we got a list of all wines the ship had in stock for pouring (about 75 different labels) and were able to choose satisfactory labels from that. This was the only cruise in our 123 days with Regent that I had to send steaks back because they were full of gristle and fat. Compass Rose and Prime 7. The lobster in Prime 7 was overcooked also. We are booked for 63 days on the Voyager in 2014 and I am having second thoughts before committing the final payment. Read Less
1 Helpful Vote
Sail Date: July 2011
Before we began the cruise, we spent three days in an apartment in Reykjavik. I would recommend a stay in Iceland to anyone cruising in that part of the world. Iceland is beautiful in a wild and unique way. MV Fram, built by ... Read More
Before we began the cruise, we spent three days in an apartment in Reykjavik. I would recommend a stay in Iceland to anyone cruising in that part of the world. Iceland is beautiful in a wild and unique way. MV Fram, built by Hurtigruten in 2007 especially for cruising the polar regions, is a wonderful ship. According to Hurtigruten, it carries 318 passengers, but we were told the ship was full on this voyage with 227. The average age of passengers was typical for an expedition-type cruise, i.e., younger than on large ships. There were two or three people with physical handicaps (one in a wheelchair) and a number of children. Eighty to ninety percent of the passengers were Scandinavians (93 Norwegians) and Germans. There were only four Americans aboard, along with a handful of people from other English-speaking countries. The official language of the voyage was English. Check-in on the ship in Reykjavik was chaotic. Help with luggage was available upon request; otherwise everyone managed their own bags. As on more traditional cruises, a cruise card was used for all purchases aboard. There was a small gift shop with clothing appropriate for the voyage, along with some souvenir items and toiletries. Alcohol, soft drinks, and premium coffees could be purchased. Shore excursions were included in the cruise price, and all passengers were given windbreakers as a memento of the voyage. There were two dinner seatings with assigned tables, but due to the nature of the trip, all but two nights were buffets with open seating. The food was Scandinavian, meaning good fresh fish (such as salmon) at dinner, and smoked or marinated fish as a choice at every buffet. Besides the fish and excellent desserts, the food was uninspired, to say the least. Vegetarians, diabetics, and people with gluten intolerance were provided for. A snack bar with complimentary coffee, tea, hot chocolate, cookies, and small sandwiches was open 24/7. There was no room service. The cruise itself was an unforgettable experience. After one sea day we reached Jan Mayen Island, a tiny Norwegian outpost 370 miles NE of Iceland. It is inhabited only by fourteen hardy souls who run the weather station there. There is no harbor, no regular air service, and no tourist facilities. The only visitors are the occasional yachts that anchor there. The Fram was the first cruise ship to call there. Our landing was made on a rocky beach from "Polarcirkel" boats (similar to Zodiacs), and required waterproof boots. Jan Mayen is a wild, desolate place with essentially no vegetation. The perfectly shaped volcano last erupted in the 1970's, and the whole island consists of lava rock. The weather was relatively mild, with calm seas and temperatures in the forties. While we were ashore the volcano was obscured by clouds, but later that night the midnight sun appeared and illuminated the snow-covered peak with its glaciers. As if on cue, three Minke whales also appeared. After another sea day we arrived at Spitsbergen, where our first stop was to be Longyearbyen, the largest settlement in the Svalbard archipelago. As luck would have it, an ice-field totally filled the Isfjorden. The Fram is designed to break through such ice floes, but progress was so slow that after two hours the captain made the decision to cancel that stop and head north. Standing on the bow (fully covered with wind-proof pants, jacket, hood, boots, and heavy long-johns) watching our laborious progress through the ice, I felt a long, long way from home. We saw many birds taking advantage of the shifting ice floes: puffins, guillemots, auks, fulmars, gulls, and arctic terns. Our trip north along the west coast of Spitsbergen took us past an incredible landscape of mountains, glaciers and blue skies. The next morning we stopped for a guided tour of Ny Alesund, a small settlement made up of scientists from different countries doing various polar research projects. Cruise ships and yachts do stop there, but there are no facilities except a small gift shop and a museum. Ny Alesund used to be a mining town, and most of the buildings are remodeled houses from that era. Later that day we made a landing at the beach in beautiful Magdalena Fjord, where blubber ovens were still visible from the days when whaling ships used this natural harbor (ice-free year round due to the Gulf Stream) as headquarters for their activities in this part of the world. While leaving Magdalena Fjord we saw our only polar bears of the trip, unfortunately far in the distance. It was a mother and cub. After midnight that night (still bright sunlight) we reached Moffin Island off the north coast of Spitsbergen. It's a walrus preserve, so we were not allowed to go ashore but could see the walrus colony quite clearly. There were other wonderful experiences sailing through the many fjords and past the countless glaciers and bird nesting cliffs of Spitsbergen. Days and nights were spent watching the scenery and profiting from the excellent lectures and slide shows of the scientists aboard the ship. Among them were five Ph.D.s in such fields as Geology, Glaciology, and Ornithology. All were experts on the polar regions and also gave talks on the history of polar expeditions, animals of the Arctic, and the like. There was no nightly entertainment per se, just a pianist in the lounge, and a couple of events such as a crew talent show. In addition, all passengers were taken on a tour of the Bridge. The voyage ended on a dramatic note with another passage through the ice-field in the Isfjorden to get to our final destination, Longyearbyen. It took all of the last day, so the scheduled landing had to be cancelled. But the ship's breaking through the ice was such an exhilarating experience that it was worth it. We had a few hours in Longyearbyen before our flight to Oslo (included in the cruise fare). The settlement has a history of coal mining and other attempts at making a profitable permanent town here, including many international disputes over sovereignty, especially between Norway and Russia. The Fram is a beautiful small ship, nicely appointed with a large observation lounge, lecture rooms, attractive public areas, a fitness room, two on-deck hot tubs, and interesting art work. Our cabin was tiny but acceptable. The service was impeccable and friendly, although with mostly open seating we didn't have much personal interaction with the dining room staff. The Expedition Team was fantastic, comprised of exceedingly competent and knowledgeable men and women. All in all, this was an incredible cruise for someone who wants to get way off the beaten path. A memorable experience all around. Read Less

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