Sarah Schlichter
Cruise Critic Contributor
3.0 / 5.0
Cruise Critic Editor Rating: Cabins

The 16 cabins aboard the Evolution feel spacious by expedition ship standards. The largest is A1, which spans the width of the top deck for a total of 263 square feet. Other cabins, which all vary slightly in size and layout, range from 140 to 202 square feet. Some are twins, while others offer double or queen beds, and a few can be converted into triples.

Storage space is plentiful. All cabins have at least one closet with about half a dozen hangers and three shelves; some have two or even three closets. Some staterooms have dressers and armchairs, while others have desks. In each bathroom, a cabinet beside the mirror over the sink offers three shelves for toiletries. Under the bathroom vanity are several additional drawers. The beds are not quite tall enough for larger suitcases to fit under them, but carry-ons can be stowed underneath to save floor space.

Overall, Evolution's cabins are more utilitarian than luxurious. None has a balcony, and only the three largest cabins (all on A Deck) have windows. The rest offer only portholes (some have two -- one in the sleeping area and one in the bathroom), and they're too high to look out. Despite a recent renovation, the decor feels a little dated and the towels a little thin. Our air-conditioning unit started rattling on day two, and while a crewmember came swiftly to fix it, it was still prone to a few creaks and groans.

In the bathroom, the shower has decent water pressure and is quite roomy (my XL-sized travel companion was able to move around comfortably). The water temperature can be a bit iffy, depending on what's going on elsewhere on the ship. The shower is stocked with wall dispensers of shampoo, conditioner and shower gel (provided by Amenigraf, an Ecuadorean brand), and there's a clothesline for hanging bathing suits and other wet items. A hair dryer is located in one of the drawers under the sink.

Beside the toilet is a small trash can for depositing toilet paper. (Flushing paper interferes with the ship's waste treatment system.) The can is emptied a few times a day by the cabin attendant, who also makes the beds and does some general tidying. Perhaps you'll see the occasional towel animal.

Cabins do not include amenities like TVs or minibars.

Although laundry is not available onboard, the crew can arrange for your clothes to be cleaned during the port call in Puerto Ayora; just consult with the hotel manager.

Power outlets are American, but you might not want to bring all of your favorite devices along. Wi-Fi is not available on the ship, and cell phones don't work well in most parts of the Galapagos, either. All cabins do have telephones, should you need to make an international call. Each cabin has a safe for valuables, but it's not quite large enough for a full-sized laptop.

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