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2 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: November 2018
It was ok to meet & visit with the locals. It was interesting, but I did not enjoy that they'd expect you to buy things from them or pay them when you take photos of them or their things. An uneasy feeling...just saying.
It was ok to meet & visit with the locals. It was interesting, but I did not enjoy that they'd expect you to buy things from them or pay them when you take photos of them or their things. An uneasy feeling...just saying. Read Less
5 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: August 2018
Great fun meeting the locals. Was not able to swim/snorkel due to low tide.
Great fun meeting the locals. Was not able to swim/snorkel due to low tide. Read Less
8 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: October 2017
No shore excursions available but the people & children were very friendly & happy to see the "rich" people from the ship! They appreciated the donations we made.
No shore excursions available but the people & children were very friendly & happy to see the "rich" people from the ship! They appreciated the donations we made. Read Less
13 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: October 2017
ral is not far off the beach; as you move farther out, the water is clearer and coral most impressive. On the main island there are some skull caves you can visit, which we didn’t do. There is no food for purchase except local ... Read More
ral is not far off the beach; as you move farther out, the water is clearer and coral most impressive. On the main island there are some skull caves you can visit, which we didn’t do. There is no food for purchase except local fruits, but you can buy fresh coconuts to drinks, along with soda and local beer. Port 3: Kiriwina Kiriwina is actually very close to Kitava, so I imagine we floated around that evening on our way to Kiriwina. Kiriwina is the largest and most populous island (12,000 residents) in the Trobriand Islands. The ship tenders at Kaibola village, the northern most point of the island and furthest from the largest settlement of Losuia. This port is very similar to Kitava with no ship excursions available. Once again there were so many people gathered on the beach and in the village. Carvers and weavers displayed their wares, groups of traditionally attired school children sung for donations, and tour guides loitered around. The residents of Kiriwina seemed marginally more prepared for tourists and we found them more comfortable approaching and talking with tourists. On Kiriwina, I would recommend doing the following things: Browse and purchase more wood carvings and weaved items. We had already purchased a few things on Kitava, but found the carvings to be more polished on Kiriwina. There were also larger items, like big bowls and tables for sale. Pick up one of the local unofficial guides to show you around the villages. We spent 1.5 hours wandering around and learning more about village life on the island. Spend time on the beautiful beach and hire a boy to take you out in a small canoe (5-10 Kina) Sometimes the locals organize a Trobriand Cricket match near the tender landing. This is a unique game that is part mating ritual, part peaceful alternative to inter-tribal warfare and part singing and dancing. Locals do cook fresh lobster tails for sale and there are other fresh items to purchase. Visit a skull cave You can snorkel off the beach, but we didn’t find it anywhere near as nice as the snorkeling on Kitava the day before. boats Trobriand Go for a ride with one of the young boys in a traditional canoe Right away you will notice that Kiriwina feels more developed then Kitava, but only slightly. While locals still live in the same basic accommodation, there were more buildings made out of manufactured wood. There is a Rotary project in Kaibola where they are building a clinic, school and expanding the one water pump. We saw some generators and a few more pieces of modern life. Shortly after getting to land we met a lovely man that became our guide for the day. His English was better then our guide from Kitava and he seemed more comfortable with his guide role. He lived in a village a couple of hours walk away and he had a son studying at the University in Rabaul. He walked us around the nearby villages, showing us the yam houses and answering our questions about life on the island. Once again, we donated school supplies to the schools and the kids enjoyed giving out bouncy balls and pencils to children as we were walking around. It really was magic to see our kids understanding how good it feels to give. They loved high-fiving the kids as they walked by and greeting the villagers with a big smile and hello. I did ask our guide how the island felt about the cruise ships visiting and he was adamant that it is a really good thing for them. He said that the ships coming keep the peace between the villages and inject cash into their island. He said that while he was a farmer and carver, that does not provide money for him to pay his son’s university fees. We walked back to the beach and spent a few hours swimming and relaxing. Our guide offered to watch our things for us, but we felt like our things were safe and encouraged him to meet other tourists to tour around. We again paid our guide 50K because we really enjoyed our time with him and his openness to answer our questions. On the beach in Kiriwina there are lots of young boys in dugout canoes offering to take you out in their boats. Some people might tire of the constant visits from these boys, but they are very polite and sweet. We did pay 10K for our kids to be taken out for a ride by one of the boys. We tried snorkeling off the beach, but didn’t find anything really good. Read Less
10 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: May 2017
We missed Kitava, but Kiriwina. We picked up a local guide on shore tand was shown around the school and village. She spoke good English and we learned a lot from her.
We missed Kitava, but Kiriwina. We picked up a local guide on shore tand was shown around the school and village. She spoke good English and we learned a lot from her. Read Less
17 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: May 2017
Hey great people, I want to move there. The art is still reasonably authentic and inexpensive. Just watch out for the wood you buy and stay away from anything with skin on it or lose it to customs when you get back. Take Kina with you and ... Read More
Hey great people, I want to move there. The art is still reasonably authentic and inexpensive. Just watch out for the wood you buy and stay away from anything with skin on it or lose it to customs when you get back. Take Kina with you and you will be swamped with the locals wanting to change AUS dollars into Kina. Read Less
5 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: April 2017
Kiriwina is a very rustic island, with very friendly people, so eager to please and help you. The entire villages seemed to line the main street with their wares up to a village 20mins walk away. Upon returning to the beach, I found a ... Read More
Kiriwina is a very rustic island, with very friendly people, so eager to please and help you. The entire villages seemed to line the main street with their wares up to a village 20mins walk away. Upon returning to the beach, I found a local trader selling freshly caught and cooked Crayfish for $10 each. Kitava unfortunately was a no go as seas were too rough to do tendering to the shore. Read Less
20 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: November 2016
These islands can be confronting when you realise the poverty of these beautiful people. To think that there are villages with no soap or towels, schools with next to nothing. They gratefully accept any donations. However with tribal lands ... Read More
These islands can be confronting when you realise the poverty of these beautiful people. To think that there are villages with no soap or towels, schools with next to nothing. They gratefully accept any donations. However with tribal lands involved some villages and schools miss out. Their souvenirs are beautifully crafted. Don't quibble or try to negotiate on the price. Read Less
22 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: November 2016
Mixed opinions here. Loved Kitava-lovely beach, very nice people, plenty of shade to sit in & I wish I'd spent more of my Kina here. Kiriwina was not so nice-nowhere to sit in the shade without paying to do so, & the people ... Read More
Mixed opinions here. Loved Kitava-lovely beach, very nice people, plenty of shade to sit in & I wish I'd spent more of my Kina here. Kiriwina was not so nice-nowhere to sit in the shade without paying to do so, & the people were quite aggressive in their pursuit of money. Both had lots of nice wooden articles for sale. Read Less
31 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: October 2016
Amazing. Just a beautiful beach and excellent snorkeling and lots of locals selling food, souvenirs, arts and crafts. The whole island comes down to the beach when a ship is in port. There are a few sights like a skull cave you can hire a ... Read More
Amazing. Just a beautiful beach and excellent snorkeling and lots of locals selling food, souvenirs, arts and crafts. The whole island comes down to the beach when a ship is in port. There are a few sights like a skull cave you can hire a local to show you and a few local villages. But the real attraction is the beach and clear, warm, calm water teaming with tropical fish and colorful coral. Local boys will take you on an outrigger canoe rides. Read Less
10 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: September 2016
The village people were very friendly and although it rained in both ports we really enjoyed the experience.
The village people were very friendly and although it rained in both ports we really enjoyed the experience. Read Less
9 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: September 2016
Beautiful islands and lovely people. Very welcoming and friendly. We were able to watch one of the fabled Trobriand Island cricket matches, it was hilarious and confusing at the same time.
Beautiful islands and lovely people. Very welcoming and friendly. We were able to watch one of the fabled Trobriand Island cricket matches, it was hilarious and confusing at the same time. Read Less
10 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: September 2016
Kiriwina - The ride ashore was only about ten minutes and we alighted onto a long concrete jetty with a rail on one side, stretching some forty yards to the shore. Walking along this jetty we were bombarded by kids in small canoes asking ... Read More
Kiriwina - The ride ashore was only about ten minutes and we alighted onto a long concrete jetty with a rail on one side, stretching some forty yards to the shore. Walking along this jetty we were bombarded by kids in small canoes asking for money. Reaching the shore, it was surprising how steeply the beach shelved to reach the water's edge. The locals as we were to find out later, were segregated from the passengers, by a little fence - a tree branch stuck in the ground and a bit of wire strung between it. Behind this was a constant stream of villagers going about their normal daily lives, but the sellers were strung along the shore side with their goods laid out on huge banana leaves. These ranged from wooden items, intricately carved bowls, etc. with beautiful prices to match! Objects resembling black plaited small sticks turned out to be tobacco. Also on sale were both cooked and uncooked small lobsters and crabs, these too were not cheap. Observations - less people seemed to speak any English here, unlike those in Dioni, but those who did, spoke good English. Most of course knew Hello and Bye Bye. Foreigners/Westerners are called "Dim dim" by these islanders - aptly titled for some of our passengers (!), and my blonde hair was a magnet for many of the curious, mainly the children, of which there are a lot. Stopping to speak to a little boy about two who was sitting on the ground with his family, I held out my hand to shake his, pointing to myself and saying "dim dim", his curiosity overcame his shyness and he took my hand, only to recoil in horror, rushed back to his mother and threw himself into his mother's arms. She smiled, but I felt I must have appeared to be an alien to him! Another surprise was that all the locals were fully clothed, men and boys wearing tee shirts and shorts, and the ladies, dresses, with only the young male children bare breasted. This seems to indicate that the "dancers" of Dioni, specifically put on this show for the tourists, and away from the attention, wear normal Western clothes. As we retraced our steps back to the jetty, there was a man who we had heard with a loud speaker talking in the local tongue and we asked what he was saying. Apparently he was the local Consul whose job it was to keep the villagers under control, hence the fence, saying they had now had their "sales" opportunity and to return to their tasks etc. He reiterated that he was doing this for the security of the passengers from cruise ships. He realised of course, that no trouble, would mean the return of the cruise lines. Kitava With the rain holding off for longer periods now, we ventured ashore to the island to see if we could find out why the Kitavans are so healthy, having a diet so similar to that of the Kiriwinas, who apparently have a large percentage of child mortality, and do not live to old age. Seeing how near relatively speaking, the two islands are, this seems to be an enigma. Unfortunately once it was open house for the tenders, the rain came down, so, with only shorts and sandals, we decided to go ahead. Once again the jetty was of concrete with hand rails all along. Shorter than in Kiriwina, there were only a few small steps and you were on the sand. The beach here was level and the trees were much taller and denser and reached almost to the sea. Most of the villagers were sheltering under banana leaves, many had umbrellas, or were in little old fashioned market stalls. Most had their goods laid out on banana leaves or pieces of material. The items on sale here were mainly wooden ornaments and shells, although we did see one baseball cap. It was even too wet to take photographs with the risk of a wet camera. Not to be outdone we stood under the awning of the Princess security at the edge of the jetty leading to the tender and took a few pictures, although not near enough to take the people. They really are totally different to any of the other islanders we have previously seen. More akin to the Polynesians, they really are a lovely looking people without the extreme curly hair of the previous inhabitants of the other islands we had visited. It was a pity that we did not see any of the healthy food for which they are famous. Soaked to the skin, we walked along the jetty to the waiting tender. This was tender No. 3, one we had previously experienced, this one has one window pane missing, and the roof leaks like a sieve, and was dripping down on us like a waterfall. We were half way back to the ship before an oil skinned member of the crew, decided to pull down the side flaps, where the rain was coming in, in a steady torrent! By the time we had arrived back to the ship ten minutes later, we were wetter than we had been ashore! Read Less
1 Helpful Vote
Sail Date: May 2016
virtually untouched by modern progress.. people very friendly
virtually untouched by modern progress.. people very friendly Read Less

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