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We chose this cruise because we hadn't cruised with Princess before, and Majestic Princess was available at a realistic price from Sydney to Auckland. We were delighted with the decor and ambience of the ship, it really is beautifully decorated. Everywhere you went there was evidence of careful thought and design, pleasing to the eye and simple yet delightful. The entertainment was first class, the production crew, and the rest of the entertainment team were easily among the best we have cruised with. The dining room staff left nothing to be desired, the cabin steward likewise and all personnel contributed to a very pleasant experience. There were a few negative experiences, however. Overall the ship appears to accommodate 3500 approx, but some main public areas cater for much much less. The Hollywood Conservatory is an excellent area to relax, but doesn't accomodate many people. Seated forward views are only available from 3 cane suites, which can seat up 6 each, but were usually occupied by 1 person each. There were 4 or 5 card tables, but unless you were there by 7am on a sea day, you had no chance. Along each side of the conservatory were 8 or 10 or so side looking cabanas for 2-4 people each, likewise you had to be there early. The Piazza is a magnificent area, but seats far too few for the entertainment spectacles it provided. It seats around 50-60 directly, with more seats available in the bars overlooking, but only those closest to the balcony rails had a decent view. Consequently many people missed out because they couldn't bear to stand for long - a consequence of age unfortunately. The spiral staircases connecting the three decks of the Piazza are beautiful to look at, and have safety treads built in, but still need a lot of care as the width varies from side to side. When people stand on these to watch the show, you are forced to use the narrow side of the stairs, which can be dangerous if you are not careful where you place your feet. Overall the ship appears to be designed for summer/warm sea cruising. The outdoor areas are well designed for relaxation, and accommodate a lot more people than the indoor ones. There are areas dedicated to golf driving, table tennis, golf putting, basketball, shuffleboard, plus a good selection of fitness and training machines, and much more. The pools and spas were popular, unfortunately the weather was not conducive for much in the way of outdoor activity, due to strong cold winds mainly. The Hollywood pool was indoors though, and had plenty of seating poolside. One negative was that the Lido deck, and others, always appeared to be wet. This is possibly because the drainage areas around the sides of the deck were too shallow for the amount of water sloshing around, either from the sky or the swimming pools. This was also true of the Seawalk, a terrifying but not to be missed experience to look down onto the sea beneath. This also was nearly constantly wet, with the fear of tripping or slipping spoiling the experience, even though the weather was mostly light drizzle and moderate seas. The lack of a true Promenade deck was a disappointment. Yes, they call it the Promenade Deck, and you can walk along it. However you are sharing most of the deck with lifeboats, and they restrict the width of the deck down to just enough room for two average sized people to pass. Elbows-out walkers need all this room for themselves!. It is impossible to walk right around the ship on the Promenade, being blocked at bow & stern. There are some areas, mainly outside of the shops, with cane tables and chairs provided, these areas are normal deck width, and a good place to relax away from the crush of passengers, as most people never discover them. Although corrosion and wear and tear are to be expected at sea, it was disappointing to see, under the Lido deck, and visible from many stateroom balconies if you looked up, that many pipe supporting brackets and some weld lines were already starting to rust. This points to either inadequate material specifications, specifications not properly followed, or improper installation. Also noticeable was the state of some balcony railings, the varnish failing and revealing bare wood, while next door the varnish is in perfect condition. On the positive side, the airconditioning throughout the ship functioned well. In the stateroom, the controls were as responsive as A/C gets, a small adjustment in the temperature dial brought forth a corresponding change in the temperature of the room. In the theatres the room was not allowed to get uncomfortably hot before the A/C kicked in, and it brought the temperature down reasonably quickly. Nor did it become too cold, or feel that you were sitting in a draught. There was a fair amount of wind noise when it first kicked in, but only to be expected, and it soon subsided. We were disappointed to find that the Hollywood Conservatory, and the Vista lounge were often closed for 'private functions' in the afternoons or evenings. With so many people on board quiet spaces outside of your cabin were hard to find, and the restrictions these private functions imposed were irritating. The ports we called at were mostly enjoyable, we had been to all of them before, and only took two Shore Excursions, to Port Arthur(Hobart) and Lanarch Castle (Dunedin). These were both interesting and informative. The least enjoyable port was Wellington, which we know well. We had previously visited Te Papa, and the Weta Cave, along with the First World War exhibition, which should not be missed otherwise. We didn't enjoy Wellington because it was cold & windy, it was the Saturday of Labour weekend, and most of the shops were shut. The free shuttle dropped us near Cuba Street, which is quirky, ethnic, rundown and in need of a refurbishment. We tried to walk to Lambton Quay but the wind defeated us, and we returned to the ship. Napier was the best port call. Even though it was the Sunday of Labour weekend, everything appeared to be open, Emerson St was buzzing, and the Vintage Car Club turned out in force, dressed in period costume, and came to farewell us at the wharf. We took a ride in one of these, a 1929(?) Hupmobile, with a very talkative and lively driver. Napier, and Bob our driver, take a bow. All the Port calls were interesting in their own right, e.g. Melbourne is a fascinating city, and the free tram service makes it so easy to get around the city centre. Akaroa is beautiful. Tauranga is the gateway to Hobbiton, and Rotorua/Te Puia for cruisers, which are well worth seeing. Overall we very much enjoyed our cruise.

Beautiful ship

Majestic Princess Cruise Review by scitor

1 person found this helpful
Trip Details
We chose this cruise because we hadn't cruised with Princess before, and Majestic Princess was available at a realistic price from Sydney to Auckland.

We were delighted with the decor and ambience of the ship, it really is beautifully decorated. Everywhere you went there was evidence of careful thought and design, pleasing to the eye and simple yet delightful.

The entertainment was first class, the production crew, and the rest of the entertainment team were easily among the best we have cruised with. The dining room staff left nothing to be desired, the cabin steward likewise and all personnel contributed to a very pleasant experience.

There were a few negative experiences, however.

Overall the ship appears to accommodate 3500 approx, but some main public areas cater for much much less. The Hollywood Conservatory is an excellent area to relax, but doesn't accomodate many people. Seated forward views are only available from 3 cane suites, which can seat up 6 each, but were usually occupied by 1 person each. There were 4 or 5 card tables, but unless you were there by 7am on a sea day, you had no chance. Along each side of the conservatory were 8 or 10 or so side looking cabanas for 2-4 people each, likewise you had to be there early.

The Piazza is a magnificent area, but seats far too few for the entertainment spectacles it provided. It seats around 50-60 directly, with more seats available in the bars overlooking, but only those closest to the balcony rails had a decent view. Consequently many people missed out because they couldn't bear to stand for long - a consequence of age unfortunately. The spiral staircases connecting the three decks of the Piazza are beautiful to look at, and have safety treads built in, but still need a lot of care as the width varies from side to side. When people stand on these to watch the show, you are forced to use the narrow side of the stairs, which can be dangerous if you are not careful where you place your feet.

Overall the ship appears to be designed for summer/warm sea cruising.

The outdoor areas are well designed for relaxation, and accommodate a lot more people than the indoor ones. There are areas dedicated to golf driving, table tennis, golf putting, basketball, shuffleboard, plus a good selection of fitness and training machines, and much more. The pools and spas were popular, unfortunately the weather was not conducive for much in the way of outdoor activity, due to strong cold winds mainly. The Hollywood pool was indoors though, and had plenty of seating poolside.

One negative was that the Lido deck, and others, always appeared to be wet. This is possibly because the drainage areas around the sides of the deck were too shallow for the amount of water sloshing around, either from the sky or the swimming pools. This was also true of the Seawalk, a terrifying but not to be missed experience to look down onto the sea beneath. This also was nearly constantly wet, with the fear of tripping or slipping spoiling the experience, even though the weather was mostly light drizzle and moderate seas.

The lack of a true Promenade deck was a disappointment. Yes, they call it the Promenade Deck, and you can walk along it. However you are sharing most of the deck with lifeboats, and they restrict the width of the deck down to just enough room for two average sized people to pass. Elbows-out walkers need all this room for themselves!.

It is impossible to walk right around the ship on the Promenade, being blocked at bow & stern. There are some areas, mainly outside of the shops, with cane tables and chairs provided, these areas are normal deck width, and a good place to relax away from the crush of passengers, as most people never discover them.

Although corrosion and wear and tear are to be expected at sea, it was disappointing to see, under the Lido deck, and visible from many stateroom balconies if you looked up, that many pipe supporting brackets and some weld lines were already starting to rust. This points to either inadequate material specifications, specifications not properly followed, or improper installation. Also noticeable was the state of some balcony railings, the varnish failing and revealing bare wood, while next door the varnish is in perfect condition.

On the positive side, the airconditioning throughout the ship functioned well. In the stateroom, the controls were as responsive as A/C gets, a small adjustment in the temperature dial brought forth a corresponding change in the temperature of the room. In the theatres the room was not allowed to get uncomfortably hot before the A/C kicked in, and it brought the temperature down reasonably quickly. Nor did it become too cold, or feel that you were sitting in a draught. There was a fair amount of wind noise when it first kicked in, but only to be expected, and it soon subsided.

We were disappointed to find that the Hollywood Conservatory, and the Vista lounge were often closed for 'private functions' in the afternoons or evenings. With so many people on board quiet spaces outside of your cabin were hard to find, and the restrictions these private functions imposed were irritating.

The ports we called at were mostly enjoyable, we had been to all of them before, and only took two Shore Excursions, to Port Arthur(Hobart) and Lanarch Castle (Dunedin). These were both interesting and informative.

The least enjoyable port was Wellington, which we know well. We had previously visited Te Papa, and the Weta Cave, along with the First World War exhibition, which should not be missed otherwise. We didn't enjoy Wellington because it was cold & windy, it was the Saturday of Labour weekend, and most of the shops were shut. The free shuttle dropped us near Cuba Street, which is quirky, ethnic, rundown and in need of a refurbishment. We tried to walk to Lambton Quay but the wind defeated us, and we returned to the ship.

Napier was the best port call. Even though it was the Sunday of Labour weekend, everything appeared to be open, Emerson St was buzzing, and the Vintage Car Club turned out in force, dressed in period costume, and came to farewell us at the wharf. We took a ride in one of these, a 1929(?) Hupmobile, with a very talkative and lively driver. Napier, and Bob our driver, take a bow.

All the Port calls were interesting in their own right, e.g. Melbourne is a fascinating city, and the free tram service makes it so easy to get around the city centre. Akaroa is beautiful. Tauranga is the gateway to Hobbiton, and Rotorua/Te Puia for cruisers, which are well worth seeing.

Overall we very much enjoyed our cruise.
scitor’s Full Rating Summary
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