8 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: March 2015
The drop down boxes on the review input form do not have an option for the Sea of Cortez or San Jose Del Cabo so I used what I had to file the review. The ship departed from and returned to San Jose Del Cabo, Baja California Sur, and ... Read More
The drop down boxes on the review input form do not have an option for the Sea of Cortez or San Jose Del Cabo so I used what I had to file the review. The ship departed from and returned to San Jose Del Cabo, Baja California Sur, and cruised the Sea of Cortez. We choose this cruise because it was focused on birding in the Sea of Cortez. The expedition leader kept that focus throughout the trip. A birding guide from the area was on board and stayed available on-board as well as during the excursions. Those passengers less interested in birding had most of the whale watching, snorkeling, hiking and zodiac cruises still available. There were 72 passengers on this 84 passenger boat. We met at the Barcelo Grand Faro for the transfer to the ship. Un-Cruise provided us with wristbands that gave us access to the amentities of the all-inclusive Barcelo prior to the transfer. We were on-board and away on time. The captain greeted us all and a photo book of guests and staff was prepared from our arrival photos. The book stayed in the lounge to help when names escaped the memory. The cabin was a bit small but we expected that. Most of our time was on the observation decks or in the lounge. We had asked for the twin beds to be pushed together as a king and found that left one of us up against the wall. We decided to keep the arrangement and it caused little problems for us during the trip. The food was very well prepared and menus varied. Service was friendly and professional. Meals were at a set time but seating was open. There was a very good early risers breakfast for those up early. The bar was well stocked with premium brands and the bartenders well trained. Drinks were quick to arrive and well prepared. The espresso machine was a big hit. Guest to staff on this boat was 72/36. This was the last cruise of the season in the Sea of Cortez and everyone was doing the additional work of getting ready to steam to Annacortes, Wa. for dry dock in addition to their normal duties but the work was always done properly and you always got a smile from the staff. The captain and other ranking officers were often out and made a point to visit with guests. There was a medical emergency mid-week that ultimately required that we change itinerary and get to a close spot for medical attention. Guests were kept informed of decisions made without intruding on the individuals privacy and the person was taken to a local hospital for treatment. I thought it was well handled by the crew. There was a presentation most nights about the cultural and natural aspects of the areas we visited but no nightlife other than that. They really do brake for whales. Spotters on the bridge kept expedition staff informed about any sightings and we frequently slowed down and spent some time with whales or dolphins. There are a couple of hot tubs and some exercise equipment but no pool. There are no specific facilities for children. The mountains' islands' and waters of the Sea of Cortez are ruggedly beautiful. Water temp of 70F was bit cool for us but the ship carries wetsuits and snorkeling gear. There was fitting and instruction the first morning then you used the same equipment all week. The Sea of Cortez was not an option in the drop down box so I used the Mexican Riveria to be able to file the review. The cruise departed from San Jose Del Cabo, Baja California Sur and returned there. Fellow passengers were generally middle-aged and up' as we are' and well traveled. It is easy to find an interesting conversation during the cocktail hour. The schedule for the next day and sign up sheets for excursions were handled after dinner. The itinerary was changed one evening because the wind had changed and we had an opportunity to visit a beautiful cove that was usually too choppy. The expedition team and captain kept looking at the conditions to give us the best experience possible.There were usually one or two snorkel outings, one or two zodiac tours. beach activities, and normally one highlight excursion. These included burro rides, swimming with sea lions, swimming with whale sharks, and a cultural walk in Loreto. We used a couple of afternoons specifically cruising to sight whales and dolphins. The expedition team kept things moving without being intrusive about it. It was clear in all their behavior that safety was a top priority and it was constantly reinforced. This was our third expedition style cruise and was very good. The ship, staff, and location combined for a great experience. We were in cabin 203. This is a captain class room with two movable twin beds. We had them set up as a king but meant one side was against the wall. We were OK with it but consider it before setting up your bedding request. There is a small desk and chair, a good sized wardrobe, and a small ensuite. Read Less
5 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: January 2015
Have traveled on large ships and small and prefer now smaller expedition ships with lectures instead of entertainment. We had 42 passengers who were all well traveled and well educated. Average age was probably over 50. It was like going ... Read More
Have traveled on large ships and small and prefer now smaller expedition ships with lectures instead of entertainment. We had 42 passengers who were all well traveled and well educated. Average age was probably over 50. It was like going to camp but with gourmet food and drinks. Everything was very casual. The best part of the trip was the wonderful interaction among the guests and with the crew. Grey whale watching in Magdalena Bay was a highlight. We also saw blue whales, seals (you could snorkel among them), mobula rays, dolphins, and a myriad of birds. Depending on the weather each day offered snorkeling, kayaking, hiking, etc. The activities were guided and separated by difficulty levels. Free time was spent sitting on the upper deck or watching DVDs in your room. There is a DVD library available as well as reference books and some paperbacks. Yoga was offered each morning followed by breakfast. Two stops were made each day with various activities. During cocktail hour the next day was explained and you signed up for your activities. However weather often changed them. We did have a lot of wind and some rough seas so you might need medication. This was not a cruise for children although they offer designated children's sailings so they might work. Evenings were quiet with everyone to bed before 10PM. A couple of nights they did have evening lectures and once an onshore bonfire. We really enjoyed the cruise, the activities and the people. Read Less
7 Helpful Votes
Sail Date: December 2014
We traveled the Sea of Cortes on the Safari Endeavour over the New Year's period. We chose this holiday because we were multi-generational group who all love adventure and active trips. Un-Cruise was recommended to us by our seasoned ... Read More
We traveled the Sea of Cortes on the Safari Endeavour over the New Year's period. We chose this holiday because we were multi-generational group who all love adventure and active trips. Un-Cruise was recommended to us by our seasoned expert travel agent. She knows cruises and she knows us, which is why we are still shaking our heads over the whole experience. To say it was a misfit is an understatement. But i have to say that we were in the slimmest minority of passengers who left unsatisfied. Most of the other passengers were delighted with the program, the staff and the ship. Here are the PROS as we saw them: The Sea of Cortes is truly a breath-taking landscape. It is such a remote and desertic place it is best visited on a ship. There were lots of other families on board so plenty of socializing opportunities for our children. We got to swim with shark whales and sea lions (pretty incredible). Staff is knowledgeable and enthusiastic about the region. There is no internet onboard offering us a heavenly tech-free week. We really got to interact with our kids! Loreto, a small traditional Mexican town, we visited was a real 'find', tranquil, beautiful, authentic. They had a wonderful bar-tender onboard (Heather), the only staff member who rivaled our staff experiences on other ships. The CONS, sadly, well outweighed the PROS for our group: FIrst of all, the cabin and ship are very poorly maintained (from a cleanliness perspective). Our cabin, a Commodore Suite (their highest grade) never felt truly cleaned. This is partly because the cabins are maintained by the crew which also waits tables in the dining room. When we arrived in the cabin I mentioned to my mother that our duvet cover (a horrid navy blue thing that belonged in a college dorm) looked slept in. She was incredulous but, on our last day as we were packing up, the cleaning crew asked if they could come in to strip the beds while we ate breakfast. When we got back to our cabin to retrieve our carry-on luggage we saw that the beds were stripped but the duvet covers were indeed left on! DISGUSTING! The coverlet on the hide-a-bed was visibly filthy with brown dirt. Dirty towels were frequently left forgotten on the bathroom floor after the morning cleaning. Our shower curtain was similarly dirty from past use. The floor was vacuumed precisely once during our whole stay (sand and candy wrappers were left as evidence on the floor). Again, no one else onboard seemed put off by this so I think our housekeeping expectations may have something to do with our past cruising experiences on SeaDream, Seabourn, and Paul Gauguin where spotlessness is the norm. The staff is more reminiscent of a summer camp than a cruise ship or a resort: they are gung-ho but not really trained for ship service. They remind me of kids taking a break from college to do a bit of travel. Several of them are precisely that, few if any are career ship staff from what I saw. They are nice enough (although not really service minded at all) but wildly uneven and unsophisticated (they would forget the simplest requests like a glass of water, ice, a wine refill, an extra dollop of mayonnaise). The ship lacks polish in every respect, from the staff to the ghastly common areas to cabins and all the details are way more Best Western than luxury ship (and the prices are definitely in the luxury ship zone). Pillows, sheets, TP, toiletries were all strictly budget motel grade. There was never, until the very end with one or two (Ashley and Jeryd in the dining room stand out) the sense that the staff was concerned with getting to know our likes and dislikes, or what they could do to make our trip better. We hooted with laughter at Jeremy's proud proclamation that Uncruise prided itself on having "a plan from which to deviate" ethos. The only plan this ship deviates from is when weather makes whatever was on the books untenable. Otherwise, and here is where we were really fish out of water, Uncruise has the most rigid guest policy I have ever been held to. They must be scared to death of litigation: we were give ZERO allowance to do as we pleased on shore except when we were in one of the two towns we went to. One is not allowed to deviate in any way from the planned activities. Should you want to walk at a faster pace on the hikes, paddle a bit further in the kayak, go for an impromptu swim, eat at any time other that the hour set for each meal, well, pall, that is plan from which Uncruise will strictly NOT be deviating. The staff are infuriatingly unconcerned with your preferences. It's all about keeping to a schedule and maintaining everyone in a manageable group. It is adventure for the timid, the leery of autonomy, the utterly malleable. The very fact that in this spectacular landscape they have no place or inclination to serve drinks or even a snack in the open air (everything is served in the grim dining room- everyone at once) is a travesty. On a sunny day there is no comfortable place to sunbathe, not an outdoor cushion in sight, no staff to offer you so much as a glass of water. We were there on New Year's Eve. There was no attempt to decorate the ship or serve a festive meal. It was all so ho-hum. These are people who have no sense of occasion (and nor apparently did the guests- hardly any one did so much as change into a nicer shirt for the dinner- so sad!). In fact, this is how they manage the food service - breakfast is at 7:30 sharp (on holiday!) no and ifs or buts, and then at breakfast you are told what the lunch and dinner choices are and you are to give your preferences then for those meals!! Who doesn't love planning what they're going to eat for lunch and dinner at breakfast, on holiday no less! My son and I who are avid hikers and climbers had to stage an escape one day to scale a hill that caught our interest. I hated having to be duplicitous and sneak around the guides but they left us no choice. After that we felt a distinct chill from Jeremy the cruise director. He's a nice enough guy but he clearly likes his guests sheep-like and undeviant. Ah well, Uncruise is not for us. We like our freedom too much (and cleanliness and sophisticated service). But if you like everything planned to the un-th second, and an all-American crew, and super safety conscious adventure dolled out in thirty minute increments (as the majority of our fellow passengers did) - then this is for you. On a last note, the food was fine (not one memorable bite but not dreadful) but we all had upset stomachs the last few days until the day or so after we got back... The coffee is cafeteria bad. The butter is not real butter. The cocktail hour snacks were truly awful. There is no maitr'd to greet you at the entrance to the dining room and help seat the groups so it's a sort of undignified game of musical chairs at every meal. If you go, don't bother packing binoculars (they have plenty, sun lotion (again they provide reed-safe sunscreen), any sort of nice clothing (this is a strictly beige/sage-toned, Tevo sandal crowd). Do bring reading material and DVDs you're likely to have a lot of time on your hands between activities. Read Less
1 Helpful Vote
Sail Date: March 2014
First, some clarification: we were on Safari Voyager, not Endeavour...I believe this is a replacement for the damaged Safari Spirit, no longer in service. And we were on the Sea of Cortez off Baja California, Mexico, not the Mexican ... Read More
First, some clarification: we were on Safari Voyager, not Endeavour...I believe this is a replacement for the damaged Safari Spirit, no longer in service. And we were on the Sea of Cortez off Baja California, Mexico, not the Mexican Riviera. That was not listed as an option, though oddly, Cabo San Lucas as embarkation point was. My wife and I have travelled with Adventure Life about six times in the past decade, and have been more than pleased with each trip. The latest was the Baja Whale Bounty, on the Un-Cruise Line, our first experience with that company, and it was as good as it gets. The trip was a week on their luxury line, Safari Voyager. This was no floating casino like the huge cruises tend to be (hence the "Un-cruise" designation). The vessel was smaller, 65 passenger and about 25 crew. Cabins were clean and comfortable, maintained daily. Food was wonderful--the chef and his staff were amazing. Meals were varied and very tasty, with small enough portions that we were always satisfied but never stuffed. And that meant a dessert course with every lunch and dinner. The pastry chef also made fresh bread, a different kind every day. And for happy hour and after dinner, there was a well-stocked bar with anything one could ask for, and a skilled and charming bartender, all included in the price of the trip. The trip itself was pretty amazing. Whale watching while underway was pretty amazing -- one day we kept having schools of dolphin playing around the boat, while humpbacks kept breaching as if to compete for photo ops. We had an amazing trip to Magdalena Bay on the Pacific side, where grey whales and their calves would come right up to the small boats we were in. The rest of the trip was hiking, snorkeling, kayaking around beautiful islands in the Sea. We even had a once-in-a-lifetime sighting, when a pair of oarfish swam under our kayak and beached themselves. The oarfish is huge...these were each 15 feet long. They're a deep water species, only filmed alive first in 2001. One of our guides, with a marine biology degree, said that her profs told her that she would never see the oarfish, like the coelacanth and the giant squid, alive in her professional life, though one might wash up dead on the beach. They were wrong. The doomed critters were intent on dying, and probably coming up into shallow water from the deep had already doomed them. It was sad, but quite an experience. As wonderful as the trip itself was, it was made even better by the wonderful staff--every member was superb. They were knowledgeable, friendly, helpful, and lots and lots of fun. Any one we dealt with was just delightful, from the guides to the servers to the crew to the chef and his sous chefs, to the two wellness lasses--we each got a massage from one of them, and they alternated dawn and dusk yoga sessions. They all made us feel at home, and I can't thank them enough. As you can tell, we're quite satisfied customers!   Read Less
Safari Endeavour Ratings
Category Editor Member
Cabins 4.0 4.3
Dining 4.0 4.6
Entertainment 3.0 4.1
Public Rooms 4.0 4.8
Fitness Recreation 3.0 4.5
Family 4.0 4.5
Shore Excursion 4.0 4.8
Enrichment 4.0 4.8
Service 4.0 4.8
Value For Money 4.0 4.6
Rates 4.0 4.6

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